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Doctor–patient relationship - Wikipedia

Talcott Parsons was the first social scientist to theorize the doctor-patient to physicians to act in the interests of the patient rather than their own material . to teach and improve physician communication skills (Stewart and Roter, ). The Hurley case is essentially still a correct statement of the law with regard to the formation of a doctor-patient relationship. It is not very different from the ethical. HIGHLIGHTS • The law of all health care practitioner-patient relationships is based on the physician– • The core of the physician-patient relationship is the.

Some of the poor adapt to their lack of access to medical care by becoming fatalistic, rejecting the necessity of medical treatment, and coming to see illness and death as inevitable. On the other hand, the educated classes have become more assertive in the relationship, rejecting the norm of passivity in favor of self-diagnosis or negotiated diagnosis. Parsons also based his model of the doctor role on the assumption of a long-term relationship with a family physician.

Growing medical specialization and the decline of the solo family practitioner makes this dyadic role model incomplete. Increasingly, several doctors attend various of a patient's ailments, each with a somewhat different set of role expectations and interpretations of the patient's role performance. Professionalization and Socialization There is also inter-cultural variation in physician roles, and variation among physicians in the success of their role socialization.

While Parsons' model of doctors' affective neutrality, collective-orientation, and egalitarianism towards patients did express the professional ideal, some physicians are more affectively neutral than others. Following Parsons' lead, sociologists began to focus on the socialization of physicians and the factors in medical school and residency that facilitated or discouraged optimal role socialization to doctor-patient relationships Merton, Reader, and Kendall, ; Becker, Geer, Hughes and Strauss, This work generally took the division of labor in medicine for granted, and painted a more or less heroic picture of medical self-sacrifice.

The Doctor-Patient Relationship: A Review

A few writers began to focus on aspects of the physician role and medical education that themselves militated against humanistic patient care. Critics suggested that medical schools and residencies socialized physicians into "dehumanization," and to place professional identity and camaraderie before patient advocacy and social idealism Eron, ; Lief and Fox, ; and more recently Anspach, ; Hafferty, ; Sudit, ; Conrad, Professional Power and Autonomy The most important weakness of Parsons' functionalist account of the doctor-patient relationship, however, arose from his poor understanding of the ecological concepts of dysfunction and niche width.

Social structures cannot be assumed to be functional for the social system simply because they exist, any more than an organic structure, such as an appendix, can be assumed to be functional for its organism. All that can be said about a structure, or in this case a role relationship, is that it has not yet pushed the organism outside its niche, causing its extinction.

In other words, the study of doctor-patient relationships in one society does not indicate how much the particular structures and norms of the provider-patient relationship are simply the result of historical chance, rather than necessitated by the nature of illness and healing in industrial society.

And second, such a study does not indicate whether the particular practices and norms are leading in a dysfunctional direction. A critical sociology of the doctor-patient relationship thus arose to challenge the internal contradictions of the Parsonsian biological metaphor: To the more critical 60's generation of social scientists, inspired by growing resistance to unjust claims to power, physicians' defense of professional power and autonomy appeared to be merely self-interested authoritarianism.

Physicians' battle-cry of the sacred nature of the doctor-patient relationship sounded hollow in their struggles against universal health insurance. Physicians' high incomes and defense of autonomy appeared to result in both bad medicine and bad health policy, and physician's unaccountable power appeared all the more nefarious because of medicine's intimate invasion of the body, In this context, Eliot Freidson's work,crystallized the notion that professional power was more self-interested than "collectivity-oriented.

Freidson's approach to the sick role was influenced by labeling theory Szasz, ; Scheff,and went beyond Parsons to assert that doctors create the legitimate categories of illness.

Doctor–patient relationship

Professionalization grants physicians a monopoly on the definition of health and illness, and they use this power over diagnosis to extend their control. This control extends beyond the claim to technical proficiency in medicine, to claims of authority over the organization and financing of health care, areas which have little to do with their training.

There are now many studies of the way that professional power has been institutionalized in the structure and language of the doctor-patient relationship. For instance, a recent study of medical students' presentation of cases demonstrated that physicians were being trained to talk about their patients in a way that portrayed the physician as merely the vehicle of an impersonal medicine acting on malfunctioning organs, rather than a potentially fallible human being interacting with another human being.

The more highly regarded presenters were found to 1 separate biological processes from the patient, 2 use the passive voice in describing interventions, 3 treat medical technology as the agent, and 4 mark patients' accounts as subjective the patient "states," "reports," "denies,".

These devices make the physician more powerful by emphasizing technology and eliminating the agency of both physician and patient Anspach, Since its publication, Starr's The Social Transformation of American Medicine has quickly become the canonical history of the institutionalization of professional power, its effect on the organization of health care, and the profession's metastasized influence in the political sphere.

Though Starr draws on many theoretical sources, he paints a picture of the American doctor-patient relationship as a successful "collective mobility project" Parry and Parry,whose contours were not at all determined by the functional prerequisites of society. While Starr does not goes so far as to say that we do not need "doctors" at all, he argues that there are a range of possible structures that medicine could have taken in industrial society, and that American physicians are an extreme within that range.

Marxist and Feminist Approaches Drawing on, and extending the professional power analysts, the growing school of Marxist sociologists interpreted the doctor-patient relationship within the context of capitalism. In the Marxist analysis, the American doctor-patient relationship is conditioned by the "medical-industrial complex" Ehrenreich and Ehrenreich, ; Waitzkin and Waterman, ; McKinlay, ; Waitzkin, ; profit-maximization drives the innovation of technologies and drugs and constrains physician decision-making.

The most orthodox advocate of this analysis, Vincente Navarro,rejects the analyses of those such as IllichFreidson and Starr who see professional power as having some autonomy from, and sometimes being in direct conflict with, capitalism and corporate prerogatives. For Navarro, physicians are both agents and victims of capitalist exploitation, engineers required to fix up the workers and send them back into community and work environments made dangerous and toxic by capitalism.

But the professions are anomalous for traditional Marxist theory; only those who own the means of production are supposed to accrue occupational autonomy and great wealth.

Theorists of physician proletarianization point to the rising numbers of salaried physicians, the deskilling of some medical tasks, and the shifting of some tasks from physicians to less skilled technical personnel. Parallel to, and often included in the Marxist account, has been the growing feminist literature on medicine. In particular, feminists have focused on the patriarchal nature of the male physician-female patient relationship, documenting the history of medical pseudo-science that has portrayed women as congenitally weak and in need of dubious treatments Ehrenreich and English, ; Arms, ; Scully, ; Mendelsohn, ; Shorter, ; Corea, ; Fisher, ; Martin, ; Todd, There is also extensive work done on the history of exclusion of women from medicine Walsh, ; Levitt, ; Achterberg,and the effects of the growing numbers of female doctors on the doctor-patient relationship.

Women physicians tend to choose poorly paid primary care fields over the more lucrative, male-oriented surgical specialties, are more likely to be employed as opposed to in private practice, and are less likely to be in positions of authority Martin, Women providers are also better communicators Weisman and Teitelbaum, ; Shapiro, Economic Approaches The growth of studies on cost-containment, and the economistic trend of 's social science, led to the rise of methodologically individualistic "rational choice" studies of the doctor-patient relationship.

These studies usually ignored the functionalists' interest in norms and roles, as well as the critical theorists' interest in power and exploitation. Instead, the economists' model starts from the assumption of a mutual "utility-maximizing" agency contract between the doctor and patient Dranove and White, ; Buchanan, The patient is interested in maximizing consumption of health, and the physician is interested in maximizing income.

The studies then focus on the effects of insurance, reimbursement and utilization control structures on doctor behavior, the doctor-patient relationship and the success of medical agency Eisenberg, ; Salmon and Feinglass, For instance, a number of studies have documented that patients without health insurance have less access to doctors, and receive less care from them when they have access Hadley, Steinberg and Feder, ; Kerr and Siu, Research has also demonstrated that different payment structures affect physician behavior Moreno, ; Rodwin, For instance, a recent study of Medicaid case-management found that pediatricians who received augmented Medicaid fees provided a higher volume of services to children than either a group receiving fees-for-service, or a group covered by capitation Hohlen, et al.

Another strain of economistic research picks up on the Freidson observation of physicians' power to define illness, and explores the degree to which physicians "induce demand. Communication and Outcomes Two trends led to the rapid growth of research on doctor-patient communication.

The first trend was the interest of physicians and medical educators in improving their ability to elicit patient histories and concerns, and inform patients of their conditions and treatment needs, and thereby achieve successful diagnosis and treatment compliance.

Literally thousands of analyses of consultations have been done since the s to develop methods to teach and improve physician communication skills Stewart and Roter, A second trend, the rise of health consumerism, has encouraged more contractual and conflictual relationships between patient and doctor. An increasingly well-educated population has begun to challenge medical authority, and treat the doctor-patient relationship as another provider-consumer relationship rather than as a sacred trust requiring awe and deference Reeder, ; Haug and Lavin, Opinion polls indicate a steadily declining faith in physicians, and in the American medical system in general Blendon, The consumer, women's health Ruzek,the holistic health movements, and the perception of physician indifference and greed, have also encouraged patients to distrust physicians.

These trends were often portrayed by medical sociologists as democratizing Haug, ; Haug and Lavin, but perceived by physicians with alarm, especially in light of the rise of malpractice litigation. Encouraged by these two trends, symbolic interactionists Anderson and Helm, ; Strauss, and discourse analysts began detailed analyses of doctor-patient communication to tease apart the workings of power and authority within them. In particular, Howard Waitzkin,has drawn attention to the way that American medical communication reinforces individualistic, bio-medical interpretations of problems with social origins and social solutions, and thus reflects and reproduces social inequality and disenfranchisement.

Another example is the work of Hayes-Bautista who studied the bargaining between the patient and the doctor over treatment. The patients were observed using "convincing tactics" of a demands, b disclosure that the treatment has not worked, c suggestions, and d leading questions. If these did not achieve the desired change in treatment, they turned to "countering tactics" of arguing that the treatment is too weak, too powerful or insufficient.

To augment their authority, the doctors used tactics of a wielding overwhelming knowledge, b medical threats about the consequences of ignoring advice, c disclosures that the treatment may take longer to work for the patient; or d a personal appeal to the patient as an acquaintance. The outcome measures of this game theoretic situation were a continuation of the relationship, b patient termination of relationship, c physician termination, and d mutual termination.

Those who go to a doctor typically do not know exact medical reasons of why they are there, which is why they go to a doctor in the first place. An in depth discussion of lab results and the certainty that the patient can understand them may lead to the patient feeling reassured, and with that may bring positive outcomes in the physician-patient relationship. Benefiting or pleasing[ edit ] A dilemma may arise in situations where determining the most efficient treatment, or encountering avoidance of treatment, creates a disagreement between the physician and the patient, for any number of reasons.

In such cases, the physician needs strategies for presenting unfavorable treatment options or unwelcome information in a way that minimizes strain on the doctor—patient relationship while benefiting the patient's overall physical health and best interests. When the patient either can not or will not do what the physician knows is the correct course of treatment, the patient becomes non-adherent. Adherence management coaching becomes necessary to provide positive reinforcement of unpleasant options.

For example, according to a Scottish study, [12] patients want to be addressed by their first name more often than is currently the case. In this study, most of the patients either liked or did not mind being called by their first names. Only 77 individuals disliked being called by their first name, most of whom were aged over Generally, the doctor—patient relationship is facilitated by continuity of care in regard to attending personnel.

Special strategies of integrated care may be required where multiple health care providers are involved, including horizontal integration linking similar levels of care, e. In most scenarios, a doctor will walk into the room in which the patient is being held and will ask a variety of questions involving the patient's history, examination, and diagnosis.

This can go a long way into impacting the future of the relationship throughout the patient's care. All speech acts between individuals seek to accomplish the same goal, sharing and exchanging information and meeting each participants conversational goals. A question that comes to mind considering this is if interruptions hinder or improve the condition of the patient. Constant interruptions from the patient whilst the doctor is discussing treatment options and diagnoses can be detrimental or lead to less effective efforts in patient treatment.

This is extremely important to take note of as it is something that can be addressed in quite a simple manner. This research conducted on doctor-patient interruptions also indicates that males are much more likely to interject out of turn in a conversation then women. These may provide psychological support for the patient, but in some cases it may compromise the doctor—patient confidentiality and inhibit the patient from disclosing uncomfortable or intimate subjects.

When visiting a health provider about sexual issues, having both partners of a couple present is often necessary, and is typically a good thing, but may also prevent the disclosure of certain subjects, and, according to one report, increases the stress level. Family members, in addition to the patient needing treatment may disagree on the treatment needing to be done.

This can lead to tension and discomfort for the patient and the doctor, putting further strain on the relationship. Bedside manner[ edit ] The medical doctor, with a nurse by his side, is performing a blood test at a hospital in A good bedside manner is typically one that reassures and comforts the patient while remaining honest about a diagnosis.

Vocal tones, body languageopenness, presence, honesty, and concealment of attitude may all affect bedside manner. Poor bedside manner leaves the patient feeling unsatisfied, worried, frightened, or alone.

Bedside manner becomes difficult when a healthcare professional must explain an unfavorable diagnosis to the patient, while keeping the patient from being alarmed. Rita Charon launched the narrative medicine movement in with an article in the Journal of the American Medical Association. In the article she claimed that better understanding the patient's narrative could lead to better medical care.

First, patients want their providers to provide reassurance. Third, patients want to see their lab results and for the doctor to explain what they mean. Fourth, patients simply do not want to feel judged by their providers. And fifth, patients want to be participants in medical decision-making; they want providers to ask them what they want.

Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. July Learn how and when to remove this template message Dr. Gregory House of the show House has an acerbic, insensitive bedside manner. However, this is an extension of his normal personality. In Grey's AnatomyDr.

George O'Malley 's ability to care for Dr.